::: MPEG-1 Audio Layer III HD more commonly known and advertised by its abbreviation mp3HD is an audio compression codec developed by Technicolor formerly known as Thomson. Development mp3HD was released in march of 2009 as a lossless competitor to the already popular FLAC, Apple Lossless, and WavPack. In theory, the format provides a convenient container in the form of a single file, which includes the standard lossy stream playable on any mp3-capable device and the lossless data which is stored in the ID3v2 tag. To play the lossless data you need a compatible mp3HD player with decoder otherwise you would be playing just the lossy data. Also, Being a compression method, files produced by the algorithm are substantially smaller than the uncompressed source files, though they are roughly comparable to other similar lossless formats. The format is still in development with Technicolor releasing tools for consumers who are into the format. Sites are saying that it can be the one that achieves mainstream adoption, due to the advantage that the mp3 brand is well known. Since 2009 Technicolor has updated the format and encoding tools to make it more efficient, while also adding a plugin for Winamp (Windows only), a direct show filter for Windows Media Player, and a mp3HD converter. On October 7,2010 Topspin, a music distributor became the first retailer to start offering mp3HD files, stating that now their customers can have lossless audio without leaving the mp3 format. Technicolor are also saying that the agreement is very important for the growth of the format. Starting June 19, 2011 Technicolor and 10 ambassadors and Sound Souvenirs are doing a marketing campaign where they will transform 10 songs into mp3HD. People get to vote for 100 songs from their top charts which ends July 21 and the top 10 get to be mp3HD files. Encoding As of yet, the only thing capable of encoding wav files to mp3HD is the technicolor toolkit which contains a command-line encoder and decoder. This can be used with the Exact Audio Copy to rip cd's into WAVE files and then automatically converts them to mp3HD files. Another method, though only with Windows is the mp3HD Converter, which converts already uncompressed WAVE files to mp3HD and can also decompress them back to WAVE files. Currently mp3HD supports CD audio (PCM) at 44.1, 48 kHz sampling rate, 16 bit/sample. Audio Quality With the lossless stream, you get 100% bit-exact replica of CD tracks. Average bitrates are around 500kbps to 900kbps depending on genre, similar to other lossless codecs. The lossy stream, uses the same bit rates as a normal mp3 file and the lossy portion can even use VBR or CBR depending on the person's preference for compression and quality. Pros and Cons Pros Exact replica of a CD Lossy/Lossless Hybrid Size is about the same compared to other lossless formats Backwards compatible with standard mp3 players retains .mp3 file extension Embedded mp3 track and the mp3HD file share the same id3 metadata Popularity of the mp3 brand Cons Not very widespread Lack of support Bigger than standard mp3 No quality boost if player only supports standard mp3 The lossless part is stored in an ID3v2 tag. Size of ID3v2 tags is limited to 256MB by specifications; as a result, lossless part of an mp3hd file can't be larger than 256MB. Editing certain information in the ID3v2 tag can result but not always in losing the lossless data stored in the tag, making the mp3HD file a standard MP3. Products that support mp3HD Hardware Samsung IceTouch, Samsung announced that they will be releasing the first mp3 player capable of playing mp3HD lossless part of the format at CES 2010. They were supposed to be released sometime in 2010, but as of April 8,2011 nothing has been released. Software Winamp w/ plugin (Windows Only) Windows Media Player w/ direct show filter mp3/HD/surround/SX player (Windows and Mac) free, download, no torrent, warez, crack, keygen, serial, MediaFire, HotFile, FileJungle, RapidShare, FileSonic, Wupload, FileServe, blogspot ;

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mp3HD 

MPEG-1 Audio Layer III HD

 

MPEG-1 Audio Layer III HD more commonly known and advertised by its abbreviation mp3HD is an audio compression codec developed by Technicolor formerly known as Thomson. It achieves lossless data compression, and is backwards compatible with the MP3 format by storing two data streams in one file.

mp3HD - MPEG-1 Audio Layer III HD - www.technicolor.com

Development

mp3HD was released in march of 2009 as a lossless competitor to the already popular FLAC, Apple Lossless, and WavPack. In theory, the format provides a convenient container in the form of a single file, which includes the standard lossy stream playable on any mp3-capable device and the lossless data which is stored in the ID3v2 tag. To play the lossless data you need a compatible mp3HD player with decoder otherwise you would be playing just the lossy data. Also, Being a compression method, files produced by the algorithm are substantially smaller than the uncompressed source files, though they are roughly comparable to other similar lossless formats. The format is still in development with Technicolor releasing tools for consumers who are into the format. Sites are saying that it can be the one that achieves mainstream adoption, due to the advantage that the mp3 brand is well known. Since 2009 Technicolor has updated the format and encoding tools to make it more efficient, while also adding a plugin for Winamp (Windows only), a direct show filter for Windows Media Player, and a mp3HD converter. On October 7,2010 Topspin, a music distributor became the first retailer to start offering mp3HD files, stating that now their customers can have lossless audio without leaving the mp3 format. Technicolor are also saying that the agreement is very important for the growth of the format. Starting June 19, 2011 Technicolor and 10 ambassadors and Sound Souvenirs are doing a marketing campaign where they will transform 10 songs into mp3HD. People get to vote for 100 songs from their top charts which ends July 21 and the top 10 get to be mp3HD files.

 

Encoding

As of yet, the only thing capable of encoding wav files to mp3HD is the technicolor toolkit which contains a command-line encoder and decoder. This can be used with the Exact Audio Copy to rip cd's into WAVE files and then automatically converts them to mp3HD files. Another method, though only with Windows is the mp3HD Converter, which converts already uncompressed WAVE files to mp3HD and can also decompress them back to WAVE files. Currently mp3HD supports CD audio (PCM) at 44.1, 48 kHz sampling rate, 16 bit/sample. 

Audio Quality

With the lossless stream, you get 100% bit-exact replica of CD tracks. Average bitrates are around 500kbps to 900kbps depending on genre, similar to other lossless codecs. The lossy stream, uses the same bit rates as a normal mp3 file and the lossy portion can even use VBR or CBR depending on the person's preference for compression and quality. 

Pros and Cons

Pros

Exact replica of a CD Lossy/Lossless Hybrid Size is about the same compared to other lossless formats Backwards compatible with standard mp3 players retains .mp3 file extension Embedded mp3 track and the mp3HD file share the same id3 metadata Popularity of the mp3 brand

Cons

Not very widespread Lack of support Bigger than standard mp3 No quality boost if player only supports standard mp3 The lossless part is stored in an ID3v2 tag. Size of ID3v2 tags is limited to 256MB by specifications; as a result, lossless part of an mp3hd file can't be larger than 256MB. Editing certain information in the ID3v2 tag can result but not always in losing the lossless data stored in the tag, making the mp3HD file a standard MP3.

Products that support mp3HD

Hardware

Samsung IceTouch, Samsung announced that they will be releasing the first mp3 player capable of playing mp3HD lossless part of the format at CES 2010. They were supposed to be released sometime in 2010, but as of April 8,2011 nothing has been released.

Software

Winamp w/ plugin (Windows Only) Windows Media Player w/ direct show filter mp3/HD/surround/SX player (Windows and Mac)

 

  

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